Posts Tagged ‘ Bob Brown ’

Will Labor wake up?


That question could well cover a number of current ALP policies – or lack there of – but let’s concentrate on their unholy alliance with the Greens for the moment.

With the Greens’ unwillingness to compromise on the asylum seeker issue last week apparently being the straw that broke the camel’s back, at least one Labor MP, former Defence Minister and chief government whip, Joel Fitzgibbon, says it’s time to take the Greens head-on.

Mr Fitzgibbon’s anger with the Greens echoes the frustration privately expressed with many Labor MPs who believe that Ms Gillard should tear up the agreement with them.

I don’t think that would save Labor the next election, but it might save them some future credibility.

Tim Blair on the Greens:

Too many observers treat the Greens as a political movement rather than as a political party. Until very recently, when the Greens’ senate balance of power made it unavoidable, the Greens have dodged the scorching cynicism commonly aimed at other parties and politicians.

In fact, the Greens may be the most cynical of all parties in the current parliament. They exploit public perceptions of them as caring and altruistic in order to pursue agendas that are economically destructive and, in the case of asylum seekers, cost lives.

Now that Bob Brown has left the scene, perhaps these prissy care-fakers will receive the examination they’ve well and truly earned. The next election should not be a judgment restricted to Labor and the coalition.

Indeed.

PS

With a number of Labor MPs unhappy with the Greens’ alliance, can we also infer they are unhappy with the carbon tax? After all, this was a tax the PM promised not to impose, only to do so after the election at the Greens’ insistence.

Bob Brown’s new ride


I hear it’s a hybrid.

Via Sean

Good Riddance Bob Brown


Finally, he’s out of politics.

Andrew Bolt predicts a slow decline for the Greens.

Hope so. The Bob Brown cancer on Australian politics has metastasized enough.

Brisbane floods: mistakes finally admitted


In short: they stuffed it up. Then they tried to cover it up.

Well done Hedley Thomas et. al. at the Australian for persuing this, especially after initial inquiries found nothing wrong.

TWO of the most senior water executives in Queensland have broken ranks by telling the floods commission of inquiry that at all times during the devastating floods in January last year, they were of the view that Wivenhoe Dam was run in a strategy subsequently shown to be wrong.

Authorities apparently changed mitigation strategies about two days too late. They were on W1 (regular/drought-mode), but should have moved to W3 (hardcore-mode) two days earlier than they did. Reports that strategy W2 (getting serious) was used have been disputed, finally, by the two “whistleblowers”.

Cover-ups abound.

It’s really worth reading the full article (and related articles) on this one.

PS One can’t help thinking that Wivenhoe dam was in “drought-mode” for too long because of shrill predictions by the likes of the Climate Commission’s Tim Flannery and the Greens’ leader Bob Brown that Australia would never see proper rains again.

Even had the Brisbane floods not occurred, those two posers have a lot to answer for.

The climate debate of 2011: round-up


Professor Bob Carter, a geologist, discusses “the the most important events which influenced the climate debate in 2011.”

2011, and the Unlucky Country finally gets a carbon dioxide tax

Australian voters entered 2011 with the pre-election commitment of Prime Minister Julia Gillard still sounding in their ears –

There will be no carbon [dioxide] tax under a government that I lead.

Nonetheless, cognitive dissonance had already arrived on the Canberra political scene, in the shape of the Multi-Party Committee on Climate Change (MPCCC) that was established in late 2010 in order to plan for the introduction of just such a tax.

Thereafter, the political year yielded a spectacular display of chicanery, scientific malfeasance, media bias and economic and social irresponsibility, all underpinned by a confusion of both purpose and morality and accompanied by an uncertainty of outcomes: and that’s just the global warming picture.

It is fitting, therefore, that the year should have ended shortly after the closure of the IPCC’s COP-17 climate conference in Durban, the outcome of which was a politically wonderful Clayton’s agreement regarding global warming – which is to say, it was the type of agreement that you have when there is in fact no agreement. As one commentator put it, the Durban partner nations’ statement appears to have agreed to an agreement to agree in future to an undefined agreement. Science magazine Naturecommented that “Despite the celebratory atmosphere, the platform represents an exercise in legalese that does little or nothing to reduce emissions, and defers action for almost a decade”.

Read on.

H/T & H/T

Oh, and why does a geologist’s opinion matter?

Carter’s view of climate science is profoundly influenced by the fact that he’s a geologist. He thinks in terms of geological time – eras and epochs. When compared to those timescales, 150 years of thermometer readings is a mere blink of an eye. As he writes in his accessible, well-argued book:

By overemphasizing the trivially short instrumental record, and greatly underemphasizing the varied changes that exist in geological records…the IPCC signals its failure to comprehend that climate change is as much a geological phenomenon as it is a meteorological one.

Meanwhile, as it becomes increasingly evident that drastic government measures to curb a problem that likely doesn’t exist will lead to so much pain with negligible gain, and as it becomes increasingly evident that alternative energy is outlandishly expensive and grossly inefficient, the Australian Greens leader, Bob Brown, continues to demonstrate his complete and utter lack of economic literacy.

This time he wants to make changes to our Super (i.e. increase taxes on it) that will hurt those worse off and punish those who want to contribute.

This once almost quaint quirk in Australian politics is weilding far, far too much influence for just one senator from a remote, sparsely populated region of the nation.

Interesting


Certainly seems cosy if nothing else…

GREENS Leader Bob Brown faces a possible investigation by the Senate’s powerful privileges committee over an allegation he used his parliamentary position to advance the interests of a major political donor.

Remember that woodchip mill that was bought by a Greens donor – a donor to the tune of $1.6 mil – who said he’d shut it down after a bit?

TONY JONES, PRESENTER: Two of Australia’s wealthiest entrepreneurs have bought a Tasmanian woodchip mill, throwing the future of the state’s forest industry into doubt.

Wotif creator and Australian Greens donor Graeme Wood and Kathmandu clothing founder Jan Cameron signed the contracts to buy Gunns’ Triabunna mill today.

They’re paying $10 million for the operation. They say they’ll continue to run it as a woodchipping facility, but for the term of the current contract.

Their long-term aim is to make Triabunna a mecca for tourism on Tasmania’s east coast.

Bob Brown (from the Greens website):

Tourism contributes 5 times more to the Tasmanian economy than the native-forest logging industry“, said Senator Bob Brown today at the release of a discussion paper on tourism.

Would’ve been nice if Bob had provided a link to that because the info is – let’s just say – not that easy to find.

Makes you wonder; if his claim is so legit, then why is it so hard to verify?

Seriously, I’ve been scouring the internet, budget papers, links, all kinds of key word search entries, going through page after page of search results for about two hours now.

Nadda.

Wouldn’t it be in Bob Brown’s interest, if said claims are true, to provide ready access to verifiable links?

Greens leader Bob Brown invokes the gods


Seriously, Bob?

Even the heavens are clapping?

Since Godless Bob seems to now like all things heavenly, here’s one for him.

Icarus.

H/T

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 304 other followers

%d bloggers like this: