Posts Tagged ‘ Gillard ’

Julia Gillard calls Labor leadership ballot | The Australian


It’s on, fiiiiinally. Set for 4:30pm today. Rudd/Crean vs Gillard and whoever. Crean says he’ll resign if Gillard wins.

UPDATE

Rudd (who else?).

ABC Insiders host Barry Cassidy said Labor’s biggest problem has been disunity. Whilst I agree insofar that disunity has hurt them, the greater problem is what has caused this disunity. And that is their disastrous policies. The carbon tax, the debt, the boat people, the NBN, the BER, the live cattle exports, Swan’s covert money grabs, the horrendous media laws, the gender wars, the class wars, the gutting of our military, the faceless men…it is an utter train wreck. Did I miss any? Probably.

(UPDATE Yes. The AWU scandal, the bungled mining tax, the mythical budget surplus – thanks, Sean)

And it’s not her resilience. It’s her lies, her backstabbing and her obstinacy.

UPDATE

NOT Rudd, he won’t contest (numbers?) Gillard and Swan stay… talk about anti-climax. :-/ What a rabble.

ALP carbon tax driving companies to the wall


At the beginning of the year, Treasurer of the Year™, Wayne Swan, claimed the impact of the carbon tax was minimal. Swan gleaned this vital information not from detailed Treasury costings or anything like that. Rather, he went down to his local supermarket – voila!

But new figures in paint a very different and worrying picture.

The Australian Securities & Investments Commission reports there were 10,632 company collapses for the 12 months to March 1 – averaging 886 a month – with the number of firms being placed in administration more than 12 per cent higher than during the global financial crisis.

Sure. Companies are also hurting because of the GFC, and the high Australian dollar, but the timing of the CO2 essential trace gas tax couldn’t have been worse.

Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry chief economist Greg Evans said: “Rapidly escalating energy prices caused by the carbon tax and other green programs are taking their toll on many Australian businesses.

“In energy reliant industries it is already showing up in job losses, deferred investment and in the worst cases, business closures,” Mr Evans said.

A real kick in the guts. OK, so Gillard and Co. had no control over the GFC, and whilst there are limited options to address the high Aussie dollar, it is a floated currency. But the carbon tax is certainly something they could control.

It compounds.

The carbon tax – and mining tax – were also showing up as “sovereign risk” issues in discussions with foreign investors.

In short, it’s a rolled-gold disaster. Record company closures, higher prices, job losses, lower investment and for what?

The bloody tax doesn’t even make any money!

No, it’s not the only reason the ALP and Gillard are doing so poorly in the polls, but it can’t be helping. The 2PP is at 56-44 today, ALP primary vote is down to a paltry 31, and yet the ALP ship sails full steam ahead towards oblivion.

And as for the climate the tax is meant to soemhow change? Nope, it’s pretty static, too.

Sure, respect the office of PM (after Julia’s gone)


So there’s been this and that in the media lately about the, er, heckling of Julia Gillard.

Keep it civil and all that, ra ra ra, so they say.

Here’s the deal: The Office of PM has never really been that respected in Australia (it’s true, Bolta). After all, this is Australia. And good grief, Julia Gillard couldn’t have done a better job of getting that Office more despised than if she tried.

She tried hard.

It is truly difficult not to despise that woman who has done so much damage to Australia, not to mention her cabal that has done so much damage to the truly great powerful women in our country. Talking about the Gina Rineharts and the Julie Bishops. (TBH, talking about people like my mum, too.)

With any luck, this post will be irrelevant by Monday, what, with all those rumours of her (finally [too little, too late]) being dumped.

And perhaps those in the media who attempt to instill respect in our political leaders, perhaps they could acknowledge that it has become so vile towards Gillard for damn good reason.

(At least the DT has the right idea).

The good, the bad, and the ugly


The good: Craig Thomson has finally been arrested.

The bad: Australia will have to suffer the longest election campaign in the nation’s history, set for September 14th.

The ugly: Attorney general Nicola Roxon has scrapped those disastrous free speech laws whereby merely being offended would have been enough to get the speaker in trouble.

Oh, and one more good thing… Anthony Mundine. :lol:

Do the math


It seems the ALP isn’t much chop at it.

Riddle me this. With any budget surplus and carbon tax compo set to be tied to a hopeful EU carbon (dioxide) price of around $29 a ton, how’s it all going to work when it’s less than $5 a ton?

Julia isn’t racist, Lego is


PM Julia Gillard dumping a perfectly good Senator so she can be replaced by an Aboriginal, with the only reason given being she wants one? Not racist.

Lego building a model of Jabba the Hutt’s palace?Definitely racist.

The scandal that won’t go away


Talking about the AWU scandal that PM Julia Gillard is still embroiled in. Indeed,  Victorian cops have stepped it up.

Here’s a free tip for Ms Gillard: the scandal might go away if SHE goes away.

UPDATE

Word is that this could all be wrapped up in a few weeks.

Political capital


So all Julia has left is to play the gender and race cards. It’s sad really.

Rough week. TGIG


Bit rough, eh? ;-)*

For sure, we all know about the AWU nonsense, so there’s no need to go on about that tonight. But I hope everyone’s aware of Gillard’s latest time warp to the Dark Ages proposal. (thanks, Bolta).

Attorney-General Nicola Roxon’s proposed changes massively expand the list of characteristics people can be offended by, expanding the jurisdiction into shops, workplaces and sporting clubs.

The regime will provide a new weapon in the war on free speech by even including “political opinion” as a ground on which people can be discriminated against.

This extraordinary change makes even innocuous political expressions subject to the law – a person need only be offended or insulted in order to make out a claim. Shop owners displaying signs in support of a political candidate may now be legally discriminating against employees who want the other guy to win…

Not only do the changes represent an extraordinary attack on freedom of speech, they also undermine fundamental legal principles derived from 800 years of common law. They would reverse the onus of proof, forcing employers to prove that they are innocent of discrimination.

Saw that yesterday. Make of that what you will.

Um, what else? Oh, the Israel/Palestine thing. Well, Israel says they’re happy, so let’s not worry about the 12 Hamas rockets fired into Israel since the ceasefire, nor their thanking of Iran… the guys who supplied those fancy rockets that could and did hit Tel Aviv.

Anyway, enough. Music.

Infected Mushroom. Arguably one of the best EDM acts on the planet, and perhaps the best out of Israel.

*what? TGIG? Thank God it’s good.

UPDATE

No, not the bloody pic, the bloody week. I had a good week. Sorry, I mixed metaphors with that Roxon/Gillard pic. Very messy. Sorry. Please try and enjoy the music and/or comment… I need another drink and a smoke.

Carry on.

Friday Night Party Music


Yes, it’s been a while, hasn’t it? Not that I haven’t been keeping up, but have been pretty busy in the new line of work (freelance ESL) – loving it – and, well, have been trying to get the stress levels down a bit.

Tim Blair may be a funny blogger, Andrew Bolt may be a serious blogger, but lately, whenever I’ve really gotten stuck into it, I just start getting angry.

I’m not convinced that is a good thing.

Nevertheless, as I said, I’ve been keeping an eye on things, mainly via the excellent Michael Smith and Larry Pickering (whose Facebook site seems to be having a better time of things today).

That national debt hit 250 bil today – nice one Julia and Wayne. That’s a bit over 11 grand of government debt every man, woman, and child now has to pay off on top of whatever personal debt one may have.

Julia’s off strutting her stuff at the UN General Assembly. Bit rough when one wakes up, turns on Australia Network, and she’s talking. If you’ll allow one to dream unrealistically for a tic, if we lose our bid for a seat on the (joke of a) UN Security Council, does that mean we’d have a good excuse to stop paying our dues? Whatever grand idea the UN might once have been, it is an inept shadow of it’s former self, packed to the rafters with corruptocrats.

Why do we have to put up with the likes of Iran’s Ahmadinejad ranting away up there? I’m not convinced his idea of “peace” is the same as our idea of peace.

Nevertheless, Netanyahu did an exceptional job, so maybe there’s some value left there.

But I digress. As an Aussie, my focus should be on Gillard’s performance. Go to Michael Smith, have a look around, and you see that it is in fact some international MSM picking up the story of the AWU/Slater&Gordon scandal!

If it were to happen, what a venue for that to blow up in the PM’s face. That said, it might not “blow up” but it might be enough to tilt the balance in Finland or Luxembourg’s favour. That might not be such a bad thing, lol. However, it’s a little embarrassing that international media will cover something that, generally speaking, Australian MSM won’t.

There’s lot’s there at both Larry’s and Michael’s sites; Ashby’s 50K payout, the debt, boat people, Nauru, AWU, Paul Howes… you name it, but I reckon I’ve gone into all that stuff enough for a Friday evening, indeed a Friday evening that is the beginning of a little mini-break over here in Korea.

Chusok. And actually, personally, I’m taking about nine days off, so again, forgive me if I don’t immerse myself in grubby politics during that time.

Besides: China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan; things are heating up just a tad too much over various disputed islands. One lot is between Japan, China, and Taiwan which you may have heard about. The other lot is between Japan and Korea. Apparently these islands/islets are of intense historical importance, so I guess the massive reserves of natural gas having noting to do with it (It’s Friday – no links). Man, China seems really stoked on getting that aircraft carrier (thanks, Russia!) – with another homemade one on the way. Hu Jintao had the Mao suit on and everything! And, well, I guess Korea’s pretty happy upon receiving 3 bil worth of Apache helicopters.

Fun times.

And yes, well noted is that the Persian Gulf is a fun place to be also these days (there is a way perhaps that we could be less dependent and without having to throw billions more taxpayer dollars at bankrupt solar experiments).

Oh, and there’s some kind of US election or something going on? All I say about that is that 4Corners was a bit deceptive when they promoted a doco about Mitt Romney but it turned out to be little more that 45 minutes of why Mormons are so bad with the occasional reminder that Mitt is a Mormon. It was actually a rerun of a BBC doco, but whatevs, and was aired months earlier in Australia but it was on Australia Network this week. The reporter, John Sweeney, has done two anti-Mitt/anti-Mormon docos that I know of (no – not linking).
Meh. Enough.

In much more pleasing news at this moment in time, Deadmau5 released >album title goes here< on Wednesday.

:-)

PS Most western op.eds telling you what “Gangnam Style” is all about are rubbish. But here and here are two good ones.

Biting the hand


Enough with the attacks on Gina Rinehart and Clive Palmer [edited]. That even America’s NBC punished her “lauding” of two buck a day wages when that obviously wasn’t the case, is a sad indictment on leftist class warfare.

Before anyone go bagging those two, perhaps the question should be asked; “How many of tens of thousands of people and their families do I provide good, well-paying, honest work for?”

PS With the acknowledged two-speed Australian economy, and the mining boom bust, what now?

Tweets to the PM


Context.

Sorry, couldn’t resist…

SRSLY. That’s all she’s got? A typo???

UPDATE

Via Larry Pickering where I found the link, Yahoo asks, “Do you think Julia Gillard still has questions to answer over her time at Slater and Gordon?”

Not a scientific poll by any means, but JFTR, at the time I submitted my “yes” vote, a whopping 77% of people agreed. That’s significantly above the 45-55 odd 2PP vote. In effect, only Labor’s paltry primary vote voted “no”… a bit less actually.

Related.

Twenty-four questions that do need answering, despite a certain PM’s “hyperbowl”.

The Gillard transcripts: hardly indemnifying


You know I’ve actually got a case of writers’ block. Have just been sitting here watching and listening to a mini plastic Australian flag blowing and scratching against the wall here in Korea, my second home, as the cool air from the fan blows upon it.

Trying to soak in this and that and a few other things…

To have even those links published is taking on a huge risk, against a government stacked with former leftist lawyers and unionists; juxtaposed to calls for tighter media regulation amid Australia’s first ever “media inquiry” into a free press.

We edge along a precipice today.

More to come. Let me think about it for a tic. Hope you understand.

And “more to come”? How to say it. You know what I mean.

Three big reasons why Julia Gillard can’t possibly continue as PM


Not to mention the other myriad of reasons – listed here – but here’s the big three.

  1. The carbon tax
  2. The boats
  3. The AWU/Slater&Gordon scandal and cover-up

No wonder Labor’s Caucus is in crisis discussions.

And as for that list, do you agree? Perhaps the NBN,  her deal with the Greens, or something else scores higher in your mind.

Tell us below in comments. What are your big three?

No, sorry. What the PM did certainly was “wrong”


Yes, we’re talking about the AWU/Slater&Gordon scandal whereby PM Julia Gillard, then a Partner at Melboune Law Firm Slater&Gordon, set up bank accounts under the name “AWU Workplace Reform Association” for then AWU National Secretary and her then boyfriend (even though he was married) Bruce Wilson. These bank accounts were nothing more than Wilson’s personal slush funds containing money he had extorted and embezzled from various building firms in return for an uninterrupted supply of union labour.

It is also clear, and hasn’t been denied by Gillard, that she personally benefited from these stolen monies, including receiving extensive renovations to her house as well as other expensive personal items such as high-end clothing.

What Gillard denies is that she didn’t know a) that these were secret, fraudulent accounts for her then boyfriend’s stolen money and b) that her personal gains were obtained using some of the stolen money.

“I did nothing wrong,” she has repeatedly claimed.

Personally, I think she certainly did do a number of things that most honest and diligent people would consider “wrong”, including her failure to open up a file on this matter, as is common practice at any reputable law firm.

However, whether she technically did anything illegal is I think what she’s getting at, and that should certainly be a matter for the courts (which it currently is not).

Either way, it’s certainly a grey area, and politicians have had to resign for a lot less, because when it comes to politicians, and especially the Prime Minister, it comes down to integrity and whether that person can be trusted.

To say there’s a cloud hanging over Gillard’s head is a gross understatement.

It also comes down to judgement. On this matter the PM says she was “young and naive”. I’m sorry, but that’s not going to cut it.

I’m about the same age Gillard was then, and as much as I’d like to hope so, sorry, I’m not exactly young any more. People in their early thirties have been around the traps for at least 15 years, or about half their lives.

And this was someone, a go-getter, who was not just a lawyer, but a Partner at a law firm, and not just any law firm, but one of Australia’s big boys.

And what’s this I hear yesterday about Gillard giving permission to Slater&Gordon to release their own files (albeit not the one’s we really want to see dated 1995)?

I know PM’s wield considerable power, but a PM giving permission??? That smacks of something a dictator would do.

And a PM worth their salt wouldn’t be treating their constituents for mugs with nonsense responses to serious questions like this pathetic response seen here.

This “repeat the mantra” snubbing of the people of Australia is an utter disgrace.

The woman has clearly acted wrongly. Even her old law firm once described it as “unprofessional and unethical”.

Gillard’s response? Accuse the editor-at-large of the Australian, Paul Kelly, of being manipulated by someone? Who? Who knows? But how desperate of a PM to imply some sort of vague conspiracy and try and smear one of Australia’s most respected journalists.

There’s not much out there that could be more unbecoming of the holder of this land’s highest office.

More.

Larry Pickering:

Gillard said, “I resigned voluntarily”. That is a lie.
Gillard said, “I did not know what the accounts were for.” That is also a lie.
Gillard said, “I had receipts for work done on my property.” That is a deception. She had receipts for maybe a new lamp-shade and a fancy soap-holder.

More:

Mr Styant-Browne, now a Seattle-based lawyer, said the partnership “took a very serious view” of these and other matters, “and accepted her resignation”.

More background including Bob Kernohan’s stat. dec. and Glenn Milne’s since-pulled column.

PS Why hasn’t the AWU, currently headed by Paul Howes, been more active in recovering the stolen money, especially since a court has ordered that be done? And why is “zero tolerance” for corruption Paul Howes continuing to withhold files that could be important for any police investigation?

UPDATE

An absolute treasure trove of links can be found here – anything you might want to know, plus some updates on the latest, first linked to in comments here.

UPDATE

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott:

QUESTION:

You say Julia Gillard has questions to answer over her time at Slater and Gordon. What are those questions?

TONY ABBOTT:

This is a matter that was put on the public record not by me, but by Robert McClelland, a member of her Cabinet.

QUESTION:

What are those questions, Mr Abbott?

TONY ABBOTT:

As I said, this is a matter that was raised by Robert McClelland, a member of her Cabinet. It’s obviously, having been raised by Robert McClelland, a legitimate subject of media interest.

Subtle yet… ouch!

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