It’s not just QANTAS


But it is still trade unionists demanding from their employers even more when there really isn’t any more there to give.

(Reuters) – Air France canceled about one in five flights and warned of wider disruption as a five-day strike by flight attendants over employment terms began on Saturday, in the middle of a busy holiday weekend.

In a statement posted on its website, the carrier said that it had canceled 10 long-haul flights to destinations such as New York, Tokyo, Montreal, Abu Dhabi as well as cities in West Africa.

Discontent among travelers appeared to have been limited by advance warnings that reduced the number of people turning up to find themselves stranded at airports.

Ok. So there was a bit more warning there than QANTAS CEO Alan Joyce gave before he grounded the entire fleet after week after week of rolling strikes by various components of the QANTAS workers.

I don’t profess to know the pay details of Air France flight attendants, but where the EU being where its at fiscally at the moment, could there be a worse time for them to demand more money?

As for QANTAS staff, they’re among the best paid in the world.

Gotta love the union mindset.

Signed my third contract at the same place recently (yep, it’s on a year by year basis), and the base pay for, frankly, any foreign ESL teacher at schools here hasn’t budged in over three years.

Stuff at the shops has gone up, of course.

However, people not in unions don’t have that luxury of just walking off the job.

We either change jobs and/or find other ways to make a bit extra.

That QANTAS baggage handlers make more – and with more benefits – than, say, teachers and nurses is quite something, and that they want even more, is something else.

Unions: If you want a lightbulb changed the electrical union has to be called in (at their leisure), but if it’s up too high then the carpenters’ union has to be called in, too, to provide a box to step on.

Ridiculous. A rort.

As you may know, the old folks were here last weekend. Dad told an old story about his dad, after WWI, was part of a team commissioned to build three boats.

Could’ve easily been done but there was so much interference by the unions, that they eventually scrapped the project, leaving three hulls in the dry docks, and sent the project out to some European company (kinda related but the old folks had a bit to say of how Europe shapes up nowadays, too [dilapidated]).

We see a similar thing over in the US where Detroit is in many aspects a ruined city, its once all powerful car industry limping on after impractical and unrealistic union demands sent too many jobs overseas.

There is also a similar certain irony that unionist players in the aviation industry – of all industries – act in such an oblivious manner towards well-understood global realities.

And yet our government has acted with an alarming degree of surprise, despite a PM going global in her latest attempt to be relevant.

Let’s face it. In the horrendous work conditions good folk faced in the Industrial Revolution, trade unions were a godsend.

In a modern world of beyond-decent working conditions, choice, and opportunity, trade unions are but sand in the cogs of progress.

UPDATE

A reprieve…

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    • J.M. Heinrichs
    • October 31st, 2011

    A major problem generally for the unions is that their senior people are the least qualified/ worst performing workers. The ones who get involved with union activities to avoid be fired for technical/on-job incompetence. If you do find a senior type who appears competent in his job, he’s usually doing the union tour to protect his pension.

    Cheers

    • Merilyn
    • October 31st, 2011

    So much for Anthony Albanese saying it was “Abreach of faith”, he knew on Friday that trouble was brewing, says a lot about him as a Minister for Transport to.

    http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/qantas-ceo-alan-joyce-made-phone-call-to-pm-julia-gillard-but-was-ignored/story-e6freuy9-1226180960683

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