kent rizizt


It all started out so innocently…

Tim Blair linked to photo of British road workers who’d painted “Keep Klear” on the tarmac.

But then Geoffc3 of Eden NSW and Deparo Phi;ippines suggested “[t]he letter C in English is obsolete and in most cases and could be much klearer if replased with the letters K or S and be much easily understood.”

Seriously, I have never read Mark Twain…

Bingbing: “What about “ch”?

What about the alphabet song?”

As an ESL teacher, I can tell you that rewriting the alphabet song would be a bitch.

But no. It didn’t end there of course.

Rigid Nixon. replied to Geoffc3
Mon 07 Nov 11 (01:09am)

What about “ch”?
Follow the Malay/Indonesian example, pronounce “c” as “ch”.

Easy.

So now every kid has to open their pencil chase?

I’m having enough problemsh already in a country where their firsht introduction to English must shurely have come from Shean Connery.

But then as always on a Blair blog…

Nicholas replied to Geoffc3
Mon 07 Nov 11 (07:47am)

That’s the first step in Mark Twain’s clever plan to simplify English spelling.

For example, in Year 1 that useless letter “c” would be dropped to be replased either by “k” or “s”, and likewise “x” would no longer be part of the alphabet. The only kase in which “c” would be retained would be the “ch” formation, which will be dealt with later. Year 2 might reform “w” spelling, so that “which” and “one” would take the same konsonant, wile Year 3 might well abolish “y” replasing it with “i” and iear 4 might fiks the “g/j” anomali wonse and for all.

Generally, then, the improvement would kontinue iear bai iear with iear 5 doing awai with useless double konsonants, and iears 6-12 or so modifaiing vowlz and the rimeiniing voist and unvoist konsonants. Bai iear 15 or sou, it wud fainali bi posibl tu meik ius ov thi ridandant letez “c”, “y” and “x”— bai now jast a memori in the maindz ov ould doderez —tu riplais “ch”, “sh”, and “th” rispektivili.

Fainali, xen, aafte sam 20 iers ov orxogrefkl riform, wi wud hev a lojikl, kohirnt speling in ius xrewawt xe Ingliy-spiking werld.

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