Author Archive

Labor faces annihilation in marginal seats


Ouch.

http://www.afr.com/p/national/labor_faces_annihilation_in_marginal_MRqll2ldnEA2yvStbw4IMM

Does the Trade Minister read the Economist? | Herald Sun Andrew Bolt Blog


Boss: Why were you late for work?! Tardy: Global warming, boss! http://blogs.news.com.au/heraldsun/andrewbolt/index.php/heraldsun/comments/does_the_trade_minister_read_the_economist/

Kelty attacks Gillard on exactly the grounds I have | Herald Sun Andrew Bolt Blog


Even Kelty can’t stand Gillard.

http://blogs.news.com.au/heraldsun/andrewbolt/index.php/heraldsun/comments/kelty_attacks_gillard_on_exactly_the_grounds_i_have/

Budget myths and reality at Catallaxy Files


Treasurer of the Year!

http://catallaxyfiles.com/2013/03/28/budget-myths-and-reality/

competent incompetents … | pindanpost


A handy collection of all Labor’s failures…

http://pindanpost.com/2013/03/27/competent-incompetents/

Understanding Vettel’s dog act


webber-vettelAgainst team orders, Red Bull F1 driver Sebastian Vettel snatched the lead in the final laps of the Malaysian GP, despite his teammate, Mark Webber, who was leading after the final pit stop, being told by the team to turn his engine down and coast it home.

Those not completely familiar with 2013 F1 racing, perhaps, and rightly so, lament that it’s not about the fastest driver anymore.

Should Mark Webber or Sebastian Vettel have won the Malaysian GP?

Long story short, welcome to Europe.

But there are some reasons for the madness that went on last Sunday, not that I’ll try and convince you they’re legit.

The story: Mark had the race in the bag, and yet against team orders, and after Mark had been instructed by the team to turn his engine down,  the German Vettel made a dangerous overtake, took the lead, won, and for which he later apologised.

Seasoned F1 fan or not, that last paragraph just reads so wrong doesn’t it?

Here’s why.

The average punter would expect that drivers in race cars drive, er, like race car drivers.

But that isn’t “possible” in F1 anymore.

Why?

The main factors: Tyres, fuel, engines, gearboxes, money.

Tyres:

Essentially, they’re rubbish. That’s ironic, considering the best tyre manufacturer, Pirelli, is producing them. Here’s the kicker. They’re rubbish on purpose. Pirelli could easily produce an awesome tyre that could perform perfectly for three races, but they’ve been contracted to produce chewing gum. This is because F1 ceased refueling some years back, but the sport decided some pit stop excitement and uncertainty was important for the fans. And teams only receive a limited number of tyres for the weekend. End result? Drivers have to nurse their cars more than they can race them, especially in the latter stages of a GP.

Fuel:

Fill that gas guzzling fucker up! No refueling stops. Obvious reasoning was safety in the pit lane… and people have been badly burned by invisible F1 high octane fuel in the past, so it was difficult to mount a decent counter argument. The trade off? Cars are now much harder on the tyres thanks to all the extra weight, the tyres suck even more on top of that, and the number of tyres you can use per weekend is limited. Again, we’re looking at nurses as much as we’re looking at drivers. This means it’s all so much more up to the team to strategise and tell a driver that he has to cool it.

Engines:

F1 was at the point whereby teams like Ferrari were able to pour essentially unlimited amounts of money into their car, and other teams simply could not compete. This was the time of Michael Schumacher’s five in a row world championships. Even Michael was getting bored and the FIA governing body saw a need to shake it up. Hence teams are allowed a mere eight engines a year, less than one for every two races. This means cars have to be managed very carefully throughout the year. You can’t drive it like you stole it anymore. A general rule of thumb has evolved whereby after the last pit stop, it’s not about racing, but rather about preservation. This is why Mark Webber was “slow” in the latter stages. It had nothing to do with his driving ability, and everything to do with nursing that car home… under strict team orders no less.

Gearboxes: As with the engines, teams are severely limited. Nurse!

Money: Rightly or wrongly, the money-pit teams were getting to dominate to a point whereby there was no point for anyone else. According to F1, something had to be done. So they capped team budgets, limited the numbers of engines and gearboxes, scrapped the fuel thing which ended up burning the less resourceful teams, and made sure the tyres would have to be changed around three times per race… all in an effort to even things out a bit, give a leg up to the struggling teams.

Plus, on top of that, it’s the constructor’s championship where all the money is made, not the driver’s championship. So whilst us fans will cheer for our favourite driver, the fact of the matter is the team has to concentrate on… the team. And a huge part of that is maintaining a car that will last the entire season.

So what does that all translate, too?

It means drivers cannot drive flat out, anymore.

Races are so much more based on strategy by the team rather that the vroom of the driver.

It’s about managing the car rather than driving it, particularly when you get to the final stages of a race and massive points – for the team – are up for grabs.

And though Vettel is indeed a dog, considering the parameters he’s working within, there are factors… not least driver instinct which is so severely curtailed in modern F1.

Not least that Mark was told to turn down his engine… because of fuel, tyres and all that crap, and then got dogged by a bloke….

When querying the teams decision to turn his engine down, Mark was assured twice that he’d be safe from an attack from his teammate.

Had Mark not trusted his team, he would have kept his engine on high and raced to a victory.

But he he trusted his team, and he trusted his teammate… He did what was right for the team, and what is right for the car over such a long season.

But his teammate is a young arrogant punk from Germany…

Who shows no  respect.

The winter that wont quite budge


To be sure, the days warm up quite nicely. But the nights still snap in.

How to deal with such global climate upheaval.

Its called a jacket.

Julia Gillard calls Labor leadership ballot | The Australian


It’s on, fiiiiinally. Set for 4:30pm today. Rudd/Crean vs Gillard and whoever. Crean says he’ll resign if Gillard wins.

UPDATE

Rudd (who else?).

ABC Insiders host Barry Cassidy said Labor’s biggest problem has been disunity. Whilst I agree insofar that disunity has hurt them, the greater problem is what has caused this disunity. And that is their disastrous policies. The carbon tax, the debt, the boat people, the NBN, the BER, the live cattle exports, Swan’s covert money grabs, the horrendous media laws, the gender wars, the class wars, the gutting of our military, the faceless men…it is an utter train wreck. Did I miss any? Probably.

(UPDATE Yes. The AWU scandal, the bungled mining tax, the mythical budget surplus – thanks, Sean)

And it’s not her resilience. It’s her lies, her backstabbing and her obstinacy.

UPDATE

NOT Rudd, he won’t contest (numbers?) Gillard and Swan stay… talk about anti-climax. :-/ What a rabble.

Yeah, hilarious.


image

Yet another sneaky tax grab from sneaky little Swan


He’s targeting expats again. First it was our pensions, then our bank accounts, and now this.

From 7.00 PM, May 8, 2013, non-residents of Australia will no longer enjoy the 50 per cent discount on capital gain tax, a tax discount that currently applies to gains earned on taxable Australian property, such as real estate and mining assets.

Thaaaaanks, mate.

Moreover, from July 1, 2013 the tax rate on capital gain for non-residents will be adjusted. The first two marginal rates will merge into one rate, aligning with the second marginal rate of residents: 32,5 per cent. This rate will increase to 33 per cent from July 1, 2015.

And one of the side effects?

“Expats have lost a generous tax break which could be used when selling a property,” comments Sean Abreu, Senior Wealth Manager at Mondial. “At the moment I advise non-residents against investment in Australian property.”

For Australian expats who have already purchased property this is bad news, he thinks.

It always is with that goose. It always is.

Censor the media? Let’s see what the High Court might think about that


That’s what News Ltd. boss Kim Williams not-so-subtley suggested today.

CEO Kim Williams told a parliamentary inquiry this afternoon he believed the introduction of a Public Interest Media Advocate would be “of very real interest to the High Court”.

“We are confident this approach in creating the Public Interest Media Advocate and the powers that are rendered unto it and the sanctions that are rendered unto it go against the free flow of political communication in our society,” Mr Williams said.

“In the event that these laws are passed we would be immediately seeking leave to appeal to the High Court.”

With any luck, it won’t come to that, but if it does, I hope he follows through, and I hope he wins.

ALP carbon tax driving companies to the wall


At the beginning of the year, Treasurer of the Year™, Wayne Swan, claimed the impact of the carbon tax was minimal. Swan gleaned this vital information not from detailed Treasury costings or anything like that. Rather, he went down to his local supermarket – voila!

But new figures in paint a very different and worrying picture.

The Australian Securities & Investments Commission reports there were 10,632 company collapses for the 12 months to March 1 – averaging 886 a month – with the number of firms being placed in administration more than 12 per cent higher than during the global financial crisis.

Sure. Companies are also hurting because of the GFC, and the high Australian dollar, but the timing of the CO2 essential trace gas tax couldn’t have been worse.

Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry chief economist Greg Evans said: “Rapidly escalating energy prices caused by the carbon tax and other green programs are taking their toll on many Australian businesses.

“In energy reliant industries it is already showing up in job losses, deferred investment and in the worst cases, business closures,” Mr Evans said.

A real kick in the guts. OK, so Gillard and Co. had no control over the GFC, and whilst there are limited options to address the high Aussie dollar, it is a floated currency. But the carbon tax is certainly something they could control.

It compounds.

The carbon tax – and mining tax – were also showing up as “sovereign risk” issues in discussions with foreign investors.

In short, it’s a rolled-gold disaster. Record company closures, higher prices, job losses, lower investment and for what?

The bloody tax doesn’t even make any money!

No, it’s not the only reason the ALP and Gillard are doing so poorly in the polls, but it can’t be helping. The 2PP is at 56-44 today, ALP primary vote is down to a paltry 31, and yet the ALP ship sails full steam ahead towards oblivion.

And as for the climate the tax is meant to soemhow change? Nope, it’s pretty static, too.

When the lights go out, you dump the clutch and hit the gas @AussieGrit


1,2,3,4,5 BAM!

And Christian, obviously you didn’t explain it well enough.

Aaaaarrrgggghhhh!!!1

Sure, respect the office of PM (after Julia’s gone)


So there’s been this and that in the media lately about the, er, heckling of Julia Gillard.

Keep it civil and all that, ra ra ra, so they say.

Here’s the deal: The Office of PM has never really been that respected in Australia (it’s true, Bolta). After all, this is Australia. And good grief, Julia Gillard couldn’t have done a better job of getting that Office more despised than if she tried.

She tried hard.

It is truly difficult not to despise that woman who has done so much damage to Australia, not to mention her cabal that has done so much damage to the truly great powerful women in our country. Talking about the Gina Rineharts and the Julie Bishops. (TBH, talking about people like my mum, too.)

With any luck, this post will be irrelevant by Monday, what, with all those rumours of her (finally [too little, too late]) being dumped.

And perhaps those in the media who attempt to instill respect in our political leaders, perhaps they could acknowledge that it has become so vile towards Gillard for damn good reason.

(At least the DT has the right idea).

“Bipartisan” Obama won’t even EAT with Republicans


The emperor with no food.

Meeting with GOP senators, at a lunch no less, the POTUS couldn’t stomach it.

He honestly did look longingly at it, but apparently he has to have essentially a taster, and I pointed out to him that we were all tasters for him, that if the food had been poisoned all of us would have keeled over so, but he did look longingly at it and he remarked that we have far better food than the Democrats do.

No doubt, and nice own goal there, Barrack.

But dude; the food.

Eat it!

Think of your starving relatives in Kenya.

No taster?

So what?

Bring a taster.

Or was that sequestered, too?

Starve, thin man.

Did he bring a taster to that DC burger joint that time?

Closing off the White House to school kids? Wants all that bipartisan nonsense with the Republicans, yet won’t even EAT with them??? The master politician has become a master of the faux pas.

Is his teleprompter secretly a T1000?

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