Archive for the ‘ Sport ’ Category

The good, the bad, and the ugly

The good: Craig Thomson has finally been arrested.

The bad: Australia will have to suffer the longest election campaign in the nation’s history, set for September 14th.

The ugly: Attorney general Nicola Roxon has scrapped those disastrous free speech laws whereby merely being offended would have been enough to get the speaker in trouble.

Oh, and one more good thing… Anthony Mundine. :lol:

Congratulations, Andy Murray

The first Brit to win a Grand Slam since Fred Perry in 1936. That’s a long time between drinks!

He did it tough, beating Djokovic in a drawn out five-setter – equal to the longest on record at 4h 54m – 7-6(12-10) 7-5 2-6 3-6 6-2.

What if?

Man, I haven’t laughed so hard in ages.

What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90% the speed of light?

xkcd’s Randall Munroe does the math.

The answer turns out to be “a lot of things”, and they all happen very quickly, and it doesn’t end well for the batter (or the pitcher).

Other important need-to-know questions are answered such as how much Force power Yoda has. Turns out it’s about as much as a Smart Car…

The site’s in the blogroll under “What if?”

Facebook: Political abuse? No way! Racial abuse? OK.

Remember when Aussie icon and cartoonist, Larry Pickering, was temporarily kicked off Facebook for political incorrectness against the PM?

The page, which has almost 3000 “likes”, posts pictures of indigenous people with captions that some Facebook users claim are offensive and, in some cases, hate speech.

Disgraceful. But also, when it comes to this kind of racial or political stuff, I think it’s the lack of consistency which bugs me the most.

Take the current PC London Olympics. Sportspeople who may or may not have conveyed racist sentiments, or the “wrong” political sentiments, are sent home. This is despite it being the Olympics, an international sports event meant to be devoid of politics, even to the point where regimes such as North Korea, and any other “questionable” country is allowed to have its athletes compete, no eyebrows raised.

Not just there, but back in Australia too, and the whole racial/political issue is, in many instances, utterly ridiculous.

There is absolutely no consistency anymore. It’s whoever says whatever platitude feels good at the time and/or has the powers that be in their pocket… at that time.

And it’s not even what is said anymore. It’s who says it, and/or who that person knows.

There has to be a consistent, fair standard and that standard has to be enforced.

Aussie Mark Webber wins the British F1 GP

*He’s not called AussieGrit for nothing.

Having qualified second, the Australian had himself an afternoon and a half if he were going to entain the possibility of pipping the formidable Spaniard, Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso.

Check the twitter feed, and you’ll see at least one punter hoping Mark would do it by the first corner… the, er, easy way.

And there was half a chance, however the prancing horse veered right, right in front of the red bull, and closed down any further discussion on that one.

Thus, it was down to a race of attrition, and by “attrition” in 2012, we mean tyres.

Give or take, Webber and Alonso were in a class of their own Sunday afternoon, but for Mark to hold up a chunk of sweet looking gold rather than a casting of a bank’s logo, either “something” had to happen or AussieGrit had to apply the old elbow grease.

Nothing happened, and thus it became a case of quietly chipping away; a fastest lap here, half a second there.

It was a case of drive that beast until that six second gap became two cars in one frame, the Spaniard on the soft option tyres, and the Australian on the “slower” but more durable primes.

In the end, or more precisely with about five laps to go, it wasn’t even close. Mark had the tyres, and therefore the traction.

The Red Bull cruised past.

No, there wasn’t any jumping on the sofa this time, like there was in Monaco.

And Webber’s reaction was similarly understated.

Winning the British GP for the second time in three years was, frankly, job done.

*Re-written because it deserved it


Webber celebrates… not for himself, but rather for the fans.

“It’s taking a while to sink in this one. I think it was the circumstances of the race – for most of it I was marking off second place. Fernando was not quite out of touch and after the last stop, my engineer Ciaron came on the radio saying that Fernando was not doing much on the option tyres. But I know Fernando is a wily old fox, I thought he was looking after the tyres and just waiting to pull the pin and go a little bit. But when I got within two seconds I thought maybe he’s in a little bit of trouble and it was real. It was completely game on when I knew the DRS was available, I made the move stick and our hard work paid off for the win. It was a cracking grand prix today; the spectators got to see a good race and I’m pleased for them.”

On that soccer riot in Egypt

Andrew Bolt puts it into perspective.


Tim Blair on Peter Roebuck

I had no idea Peter Roebuck was such a – shall we say – complex individual. Tim Blair delves as well as anyone probably can into the life of the late cricket commentator Peter Roebuck and ponders possible motivating factors for his untimely suicide.

Yet in the many thousands of words written about Roebuck since his death, a broader possible cause emerges. It could be that the 55-year-old, whose own friends admit they didn’t know well, simply couldn’t bear to have his life exposed.


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